Standard Voters’ Guide – Primary 2016

 Voters Guide Primary 2016 Header

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF OREGON

Standard VOTERS’ GUIDE

MAY 2016 PRIMARY


StarSection 1: INTRODUCTION

This Nonpartisan Voters’ Guide is published by the League of Women Voters of Oregon. This is a FREE NONPARTISAN ELECTION REPORT for the Oregon May 17, 2016 Primary Election. Large print, audio (read aloud), screen reader (automated) accessible, and Spanish Voters’ Guides are posted at our website www.lwvor.org/VOTEResources/, with more voting information.


Section 1: INTRODUCTION

Section 2: GENERAL INFORMATION

Section 3: COUNTY ELECTIONS PHONE NUMBER LIST

Section 4: CANDIDATES, BEGINNING WITH US SENATE

Section 5: CANDIDATES for US HOUSE, CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 1

Section 6: CANDIDATES for US HOUSE, CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 2

Section 7: CANDIDATES for US HOUSE, CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 3

Section 8: CANDIDATES for US HOUSE, CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 4

Section 9: CANDIDATES for US HOUSE, CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 5

Section 10: CANDIDATES FOR OREGON GOVERNOR

Section 11: CANDIDATES FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL

Section 12: CANDIDATES FOR OREGON SECRETARY OF STATE

Section 13: CANDIDATES FOR OREGON TREASURER

Section 14: CANDIDATES FOR OREGON SUPREME COURT

Section 15: SPRING 2016 LEAGUE CANDIDATE FORUMS

Section 16: ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


StarSection 2: General Information

About this Guide

Qualified candidates for state-wide Oregon offices were invited to respond to questions from the League of Women Voters prepared by League members. Their replies are printed as received, free of edits, limited to 1,000 characters.

For information on all Oregon races and ballot measures go to www.lwvor.org/VOTEResources/ . All local races are covered there, from County to Municipal, including Special Districts.

Our candidate List order: We list both Parties & Candidates in random order from OR Elections per ORS 254.155.

Voting Information

  • Check your Voter Registration. You can check, update &/or register to vote online in Oregon. Be sure to check if you have moved. oregonvotes.org.
  • Important Dates:
    • April 26th is the Last day to register to vote or change your political party registration.
      Most ballots will be mailed to registered voters between April 27th and May 3rd. If you mail your ballot, remember to add more time because of our Oregon USPS site closures and rerouting. If you don’t get your ballot, contact your county elections office at:
      http://sos.oregon.gov/elections/Pages/countyofficials.aspx .
    • Election Day is May 17th, the last day to DROP OFF your ballot at an official drop-off site, by 8:00pm.
  • NOT ALL CANDIDATES’ NAMES WILL BE ON YOUR BALLOT THIS ELECTION.
    Oregon has closed primaries. The primary ballot you get depends on the party affiliation or abstention you chose when you registered to vote. For example: those registered with Republican, Democratic, or Independent Parties vote for their Republican, Democratic, or Independent party and non-partisan candidates, including judges. Voters who registered as non-affiliated (no party) or selected a party that does not have candidates in the primary will vote in non-partisan races only. Note that our Independent Party has recently attained majority party status and is not the same as “NAV” or non-affiliated voter.
  • To select or change your party registration go to oregonvotes.org and click on “My Vote.” These changes must be made by April 26th for the 2016 Primary Election.
  • FIND OREGON CANDIDATES
    You can find your district, your ballot candidates and measures in our VOTEResources web pages at lwvor.org/VOTEResources./ . We will have complete lists of all Oregon races and measures, by candidate and race name, and by County. For your specific ballot choices, go to www.Vote411.org and enter your address.

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StarSection 3: County Elections phone list

Baker………………… 541-523-8207

Benton………………. 541-766-6756

Clackamas………….. 503-655-8510

Clatsop……………… 503-325-8511

Columbia…………… 503-397-7214

Coos…………………. 541-396-7610

Crook……………….. 541-447-6553

Curry………………… 541-247-3297

Deschutes………….. 541-388-6546

Douglas…………….. 541-440-4252

Gilliam………………. 541-384-2311

Grant………………… 541-575-1675

Harney……………… 541-573-6641

Hood River…………. 541-386-1442

Jackson……………… 541-774-6148

Jefferson……………. 541-475-4451

Josephine…………… 541-474-5243

Klamath…………….. 541-883-5157

Lake………………….. 541-947-6006

Lane…………………. 541-682-4234

Lincoln………………. 541-265-4131

Linn………………….. 541-967-3831

Malheur…………….. 541-473-5151

Marion 503-588-5041; 1-800-655-5388

Morrow……………. 541-676-5604

Multnomah………… 503-988-3720

Polk………………….. 503-623-9217

Sherman……………. 541-565-3606

Tillamook…………… 503-842-3402

Umatilla…………….. 541-278-6254

Union……………….. 541-963-1006

Wallowa……. 541-426-4543; Ext 2

Wasco………………. 541-506-2530

Washington……….. 503-846-5800

Wheeler…………….. 541-763-2373

Yamhill………………. 503-434-7518

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StarSection 4: CANDIDATES, beginning with US Senate

Qualified candidates for state-wide Oregon offices were invited to respond to questions from the League of Women Voters prepared by League members. Their replies are printed as received, free of edits, limited to 1,000 characters.

Oregon US Senator

  • Term= 6 years
  • Salary= $174,000

 

CANDIDATES FOR OREGON US SENATOR

 

M. CallahanMark Callahan www.callahanfororegon.com  (REP)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

I support scaling back and potentially eliminating the IRS, in favor of implementing a more simplified tax system such as a Flat Tax or a Fair Tax.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

Nothing, Absolutely Nothing! Climate Change, or what was formerly called Global Warming, is a fraudulent invention by the far left-wing liberal environmentalists, and is an over-exaggeration of what I, and most rational / common sense thinking people, call Weather. Of course, when the global warming was proven to be false, due to the earth not actually warming, as was fraudulently predicted by the far left-wing liberal environmentalists, the name had to be changed to Climate Change in order to fit their narrative, to be more nebulous, to continue deceiving people through deceptive marketing, so they could continue with their fraud.  Climate Change is about controlling people’s behavior, and not about the environment. It is an effort to guilt people into falling prey to the Green Agenda, and global socialism/communism, as described in the United Nation’s Agenda 21 / Agenda 2030.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

Concentrate on items that we have in common, as Americans, as One Team, as opposed to the issues that divide us.  These items can then be solved in a Limited Government manner, by not growing the size of government to solve the problems.  Growing the size of government to solve problems is not something we should be doing, as it results in more debt, and less freedom.

S. CarpenterSam Carpenter  www.carpenterforsenate.com  (REP)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

Everyone agrees the tax code is far too complex. I support a flat tax or a Fair Tax to simplify our tax code that creates a fair construct for business owners, jobs producers, and workers alike.   Flatter tax rates for individuals and businesses will create greater stability, more investment, and more rapid economic growth.   The key to a real recovery — and to a larger tax base — is a growing economy, and that can only happen with stability and investment a flat or Fair Tax system would introduce.   At present, many business owners are already paying too heavy a tax burden. For example, if Oregon or the federal government were to raise taxes, many companies would be faced with two choices: shrink in size and lay off employees in order to keep the lights on, or go out of business.   Raising taxes is exactly the wrong approach for a nation and state that wants to see real economic growth.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

Last summer, one million acres of Oregon’s forests burned in devastating forest fires, emitting massive amounts of carbon dioxide.   In global terms, some estimates show that forest fires account for half as much carbon emissions as total emissions from human use of fossil fuels.   Oregon’s forests are our garden.   But our D.C. representatives 3,000 miles from Oregon have refused to tend our garden for more than three decades.   The proliferation of disease and overgrowth of underbrush have created a powder keg situation in our forests. Every summer there’s a tinderbox waiting to catch fire.   We should tend our garden to make sure it doesn’t go up in flames every summer. Remove the dry, diseased trees and the overgrowth that chokes the larger trees.   The number one climate change problem Oregon faces is the forest fires we’ve allowed to contribute to the destruction of our atmosphere.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

I employ more than forty employees across a half-dozen companies.   Ninety percent of my employees are women, and many of those are single mothers.   I’m running to ensure those women don’t lose their jobs because of onerous tax burden, so they can keep more of their paychecks, and so they have better access to more affordable health care.   Unlike the career politicians in D.C., I’m not running for a career in politics.   Toward that end, I will pledge not to serve more than two terms.   Congress is polarized because the vast majority of Senators and Representatives are concerned with one thing only: their careers.   The best way to cut through the polarization in Congress is to elect true servant statesmen to who do not care about their next election.   My pledge to Oregon is that I’m running for no more than two terms, and that I will never let political ambition or careerism get in the way of what’s best for Oregon.

 

Faye Stewart  (REP)  No response
D. LashoberDan Laschober  www.laschober2016.com  (REP)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

I believe a modified corporate tax structure is the number one opportunity to increase growth in the United States, including reductions in rates and a change to a territorial tax system. There is an estimated $3 trillion of multi-national profit held outside the U.S. in order to avoid the double taxation we impose. Small business would also benefit from lower and perhaps startup rates to encourage business formation.  Personal income taxes should be restructured for simplicity and to end the “tax expenditures” which only benefit small segments of society. This could be in the form of the so-called ‘Flat Tax’ or just a simplification of the income tax code we have today. Whatever changes we make should encourage savings and growth over consumption.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

The climate is changing, but Congress does not have a direct role to play and is not capable of “dealing” with it. Indirectly, America’s energy policy can lead to improved emissions and this represents an insurance policy of sorts against the possible effects on the climate. For example, our natural gas boom in recent years has proven to be an opportunity to promote gas over other fuel sources. In addition, a true “clean” energy plan would include increasing our nuclear power generating capacity beyond the approximate 20% national base load we have today. Until such time as there is a clearer and longer-term understanding of the temperature record, and until we have a full understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms, and until we have the ability to make forecasting models with a Section record of accurate predictions over the very long term, then Congressional action is likely to impose additional and unnecessary expense on the American economy with no effect on the climate.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

As a consultant for the past 12 years, I’m paid to be “bipartisan” when dealing with the internal factions of a large organization, in order to reach successful outcomes for large projects. A U.S. Senator should have two filters, in my opinion, when analyzing solutions: Does the bill being considered adhere to the U.S. Constitution, and does it represent fiscal responsibility and discipline? If it passes these two tests, then the answer is to look for common ground with other people and form coalitions around issues rather than along pure party lines. Whenever possible, common sense and simplicity of the solution should prevail. I believe the less complicated a solution is, the easier it is to understand and gain support for an idea.

 

K. StineKevin H Stine   www.kevinstine.com  (DEM)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

Our tax system is a mess. Well-funded lobbyists manage to get more and more tax carve-outs for their clients, while the establishment politicians that have been in DC for decades help pass the legislation. When politicians talk about the tax system, they generally talk about the tax rates. That’s not the biggest issue. The issue is the pages and pages and pages of tax deductions and loopholes that allow large multinational companies to pay very meager effective tax rates. In a more perfect world, we would strip away the corporate handouts that the wealthy and well-connected receive. An improved tax system will be a progressive system in which wealthy people and corporations pay their fair share, and America can have a larger middle class again.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

We must end the corporate handouts to fossil fuel companies. Those companies are as profitable as ever, yet Congress continually gives them billions more each year in subsidies.  Despite overwhelming peer-reviewed evidence, most elected Republican officials in Congress deny the science of climate change. Luckily, Oregon, with our Democratic legislature and Governor, has been a leader in the country in implementing new legislation to reduce carbon emissions. This approach needs to be taken national. Investing in green energy is investing in our future.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

I served in the military, which has very strong diversity among its’ ranks. I have been able to work with everyone no matter the differences in background and style that we may have. The United States Senate is among the least representative places in America. Despite having two members from every state, the Senate is full of multi-millionaires over the age of 60. I will go the US Senate with an open mind and find the common ground needed to get legislation enacted to help Oregonians.

P. WeaverPaul B Weaver  www.paulweaverforussenate.com  (DEM)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

Our present tax code is about 78,000 pages.  Personal income taxes should be replaced with a simple flat tax.  This would allow taxpayers to file on a one page form.  Families at or below poverty level would not be taxed.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

The science behind it should be proven by independent scientists who are not on a government payroll.  So far the whole process looks like a scheme to tax our mythical “carbon footprint”.   I believe God designed a closed weather system that goes through normal cycles.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

Encourage the voters to elect Congressmen who want to serve the people of this great land and not themselves. Then form friendships and use reasoning and common sense.

 

R. WydenRon Wyden www.wydenforsenate.com  (DEM)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

The U.S. tax code is mind-numbingly complex, increasingly unfair, and terribly inefficient.  As a result, one of the most consequential pieces of our economic policies stifles rather than encourages economic growth.   In effect, America has two different tax systems. The one working families use is mandatory and paid straight out of the paycheck. Then there’s another system for the sophisticated, wealthy few, and it distorts the system by saying “pay what you want, when you want.”  We must simplify the tax code, closing loopholes, lowering compliance burdens, and delivering a tax system that works for all Americans, not just those who can afford costly tax lawyers. The tax code has not been significantly reformed for almost 30 years, and it is long past due for a complete overhaul.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

Climate change is here, and it’s already affecting the Pacific Northwest. Moreover, an overwhelming majority of scientists agree that it is caused by humans, and that if we don’t do something it’s going to get strikingly worse.   Congress must find ways to take meaningful action on climate change by boosting renewable energy and the low-carbon economy.   I have put forward a proposal to revolutionize the outdated crazy quilt of clean energy tax credits — replacing it with a stronger, smarter way of promoting renewable energy, energy efficiency, clean fuels, and energy storage.   I’ve also pushed to renew expired tax benefits for clean energy–the tax benefits that are largely responsible for the major investment in carbon-cutting wind and solar energy across Oregon over the past decade.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

Americans expect their representatives in Congress to solve problems and work together.  My home is in Portland and I love Portland but I am the Senator for all of Oregon.  I take great pride in my commitment to visiting all 36 counties every year and giving voice to those who often feel left out of the debate.  There are always going to be things you don’t agree with others on, but to dwell on them is a waste of time. That’s why I’ve always worked to find common ground among my colleagues. The reality is in the Senate neither side has enough votes to have it their way.   We face so many challenges with high school graduation rates and college affordability, income inequality, and addressing our crumbling infrastructure, we can’t afford partisan stalemates. That’s why I try to lead by example and invite my colleagues to find consensus without sacrificing core principles. Sometimes this means progress isn’t as great as you hoped, but it’s a foundation to build on.

 

S. ReynoldsSteven C Reynolds  steven.cody.reynolds@gmail.com.  (I)
 See info added after deadlines at www.Vote411.org. 

 

 

M. SandnesMarvin Sandnes  www.marvinsandnes.org  (I)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

Flat Tax, a progressive tax.  1st we must re-prioritize our bloated, wasteful, paranoid, criminal military budget and return our tax system to a rule-of-law process.  We all know those with the means to avoid tax can easily do so.  Pfizer is sells to an Irish Co. to avoid US tax.  This quasi-criminal behavior must be brought under law.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

  1. Re-direct the Pentagon structure and budget to address this catastrophe. We must re-establish law based on science, logic, history, reason, and compassion.  This run-away militarization condemns our grand children to a very bleak future.  Many predict the end of life on earth in decades.  We must change.  We must change our Congress – every last one of them except Warren and Goddard.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

Replace the entire Congress.  Term limits so these entrenched idiots protecting their wealth and power cannot do this again.  Campaign limits and a return to paper ballots.

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StarSection 5: Candidates for US House, Congressional Districts 1-5; CD 1

Candidates for these races were all asked the same three questions. Terms and salaries are the same for all five Congressional Districts.

  • Term= 2 years
  • Salary= $174,000

 

Oregon US House, Congressional District 1 Candidates

 

Jonathan E Burgess.  (REP)  No replies
B. HeinrichBrian J Heinrich www.heinrichfororegon.org (REP)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

A simple flat income tax or value added tax is preferred.  Limits must be set on both to prevent government theft of income.  Both would help reduce the cost of collecting the tax and would prevent fraud as well as government over reach.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

The Federal Government should do very little.  Most things Congress does right now they do poorly and at a great deal of expense.  At the time the EPA was created, very few states had environmental protections in place.  Now every state has some department or agency to protect its air, land and water.  The people of each state can decide what is in their best interest and how to best use their financial resources.  This promotes less corruption and allows the citizens to have much more control in the direction their state chooses to go.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

I would do two things.  Term Limits would be the first.  This would end the cronyism that goes on.  The second is a balanced budget.  When Congress has to admit their is a shortage of financial resources, priorities are agreed to fairly quickly and waste is eliminated.

 

Delinda Morgan.  (REP)  No response
Shabba Woodley.  (DEM)  No Response
S. BonamiciSuzanne Bonamici  www.bonamiciforcongress.com  (DEM)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

We need a tax system that supports hard-working, middle-class American families. Our tax system is a reflection of our values and priorities, and so it is critical that it works for all individuals as well as for businesses. I was proud to help make permanent the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Child Tax Credit, important tools to help families get ahead. I strongly support simplifying our tax code so all families understand what credits and financial supports are available to them.   It is also important that our tax policy recognize the importance of small businesses and entrepreneurship. Small businesses are the backbone of our economy, and a tax code that supports small businesses will help grow our economy and future.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

Climate change is one of the greatest threats we face, and we must do everything we can to counteract the already devastating effects of the warming of our planet. As Ranking Member of the Environment Subcommittee on the Science, Space, and Technology Committee, I have heard from leading climate scientists about the consequences we are already experiencing from human-caused climate change. The projections of how much worse this will become if we do not take action are alarming. In the wake of the historic Paris Climate Agreement, Congress should support the Environmental Protection Agency’s regulation of greenhouse gases to lead the world into a cleaner future. I am disappointed that congressional leadership has not yet made protecting our environment and combating climate change a top priority. Rather than blocking the EPA at every turn, we should be supporting policies that decrease our dependence on foreign fossil fuels, incentivize renewable energy development and renewable energy.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

I have found throughout life that it’s best to treat others with respect, even when we disagree. That’s especially true in Congress. Rather than focus on places of disagreement, I choose to build relationships and find common ground.   For example, I worked with a colleague who wanted to improve weather forecasting by cutting funding for climate research. Because improved weather forecasting will help vulnerable communities – like Oregon’s coastline – I worked with him to craft a bill that improves forecasting technology and collaboration without cutting funding for climate research.   When it was time to rewrite No Child Left Behind, I partnered with a colleague on the other side of the aisle to pass policy for fewer, better assessments. That policy is now included in the new Every Student Succeeds Act.  I will continue to lead by example, build relationships, and work on solutions with colleagues on both sides of the aisle.

 

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StarSection 6: Candidates for US House, Congressional District 2

 

P. RomeroPaul J Romero Jr  www.romero4oregon.com  (REP)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

Federal taxes should come from tariffs on imported goods as we are THE consumer nation of the planet. Other countries tax our goods entering their countries and there is no reason for us to give them all a free pass.  There was a time when the Federal Government was funded by JUST TARIFFS.  A Federal Income Tax was strictly to fund the war machine, not to be misused for everything.  What war is still on the books?  The war against  the survivors of the Third Reich.  England ended that war a little over a year ago as those survivors, to a reasonable degree, are most likely dead.  The USA has not officially ended that war.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

There is this thing on Earth that allows life to exist on this planet.  Without it everything dies.  It’s called “Weather.”  We see a group of scientists, including NASA, who are slowly exposing the false narrative of climate change opportunists.  I see a major problem when the solution for “Global Warming”, “Global Cooling”, and “Climate Change” are all identical.  Seeing as the polar icecaps remain bigger than ever recorded I think it’s safe to say that the pseudo-science predictions are further proof that they know nothing of which they speak.  I do believe in protecting the environment.  Clean water, clean air…are conditions we can all support.  But with continued Government over reach and below board intentions it has become self evident that the intentions of “climate change supporters” have little to do with protecting the environment and more to do with taxpayer funding of work which undermines real science.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

First, elected politicians must be exposed to their constituents for who they are and how they represent those same voters.  Second, term limits. Third, Congress must be held to the same rules and law as any citizen.  No insider trading, etc. Fourth, restrictions on funding by lobbyists, and ending funds from non-American sources.  Ultimately it’s holding all accountable, but polarization will exist as long as there are those who pad their bank accounts and have motives not in-line with their constituents. After all, it’s not hard to represent ones constituents.  I know that there are those who will attempt to leverage me and convince me to fall in-line, but I’m not there for politicians.  I am there for my constituents.  Therein lies the answer, only constituents can reduce polarization by electing above-board candidates.

 

G. WaldenGreg Walden  www.gregwalden.com  (REP)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

Our tax system is broken and is badly in need of a complete overhaul. As of 2015, federal tax laws and regulations have grown to over 10 million words, and Americans spend 6.1 billion hours complying with it each year (according to the Tax Foundation). Congress should make the rules simpler and fairer for individuals and small businesses. This will help create jobs in rural communities and allow families to keep more of their hard-earned income.  The federal government must also reduce spending. That’s why I strongly support a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution. Taxpayers must be protected no matter who is in control in Washington, D.C.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

Climate change is a complicated issue, no doubt. Some have proposed a so-called “carbon tax” that would raise taxes and energy costs for hardworking families in Oregon. Meanwhile, countries like China and India would continue to emit large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. I strongly oppose these proposals.   I believe we need a national energy policy that will both protect the environment and grow our economy. That’s why I support reducing our dependence on foreign oil and pursuing alternative energy sources like hydropower, wind, geothermal and woody biomass. I’ve also led efforts to improve the health of our forests and prevent the massive wildfires that are big contributors to carbon emissions globally.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

I’ve worked hard with people from all political parties to solve problems for Oregonians. The Lugar Center’s “Bipartisan Index” recently listed me as the most bipartisan member of Oregon’s House delegation, and the 47th most bipartisan member in the House.   I will continue to work on bipartisan efforts to stand up for rural communities against an overreaching federal government. For too long we’ve been forced to endure federal mismanagement of our public lands.   I’ll also continue to work across the aisle to strengthen and secure Medicare and Social Security for seniors, reduce wasteful spending, and balance the federal budget.  Finally, our nation must keep its promises to our veterans. Americans are rightly outraged by the scandals at the VA. Our vets have fought to defend our freedom, and we must ensure they receive the benefits or care they’ve earned.

J. CraryJames (Jim) Crary  www.crary16.com  (DEM)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

Presently the Fed. Govt. is subsidizing drug use because alcohol (a legal recreational drug) abuse costs the Govt. billions of dollars to deal with but alcohol contributes far, far less to revenue. I will subsidize roads & education but not recreational drugs. Moderate drinking is defined as two drinks/day.  If the Fed. excise tax were increased to $.25/ drink no moderate drinker would stop drinking. If you are a non-drinker this tax would have no impact on you at all.  Only heavy drinkers would be adversely impacted financially.  Or., Co., Ak. and Wa. all have the right idea on marijuana; that is legalize and tax it. Prohibition and the War on Drugs have both shown that we cannot stop the sale and use of alcohol or marijuana. I would legalize marijuana and tax it at a rate high enough to cover the costs of dealing with problems caused by it’s use.    I would use half the additional tax dollars from these taxes to reduce the Budget deficit and the other half for drug abuse programs,

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

I live in the forest and have seen summer coming earlier, winter later, snow packs decreasing and the forest becoming dryer and more susceptible to devastating forest fires.  We are all in this together and we need to address climate change now if we want our children to enjoy the same beautiful Oregon that we have enjoyed.  2015 was, by far, the hottest year in the historical record, breaking the previous mark set in 2014.  Nine of the warmest years on record have taken place since 2000).  So, with such overwhelming proof of global warming, I believe we need to wean ourselves off fossil fuels (and the sooner the better). Two local examples of what I would like to see are OIT’s energy self-reliant campus (see:  http://www.oit.edu/sustainability/clean-energy )  and Lakeview’s use of solar and geothermal power.   To do this I would push for a revenue neutral solution using either a carbon tax or a cap and trade scheme (See https://citizensclimatelobby.org/carbon-fee-and-dividend/ ).

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

In my 25+ years of drafting and negotiating contracts I learned that:  1.       If two parties want to reach a deal they can; 2.       One party can, if they are strong enough, force a bad deal upon the other party; 3.       The one-sided, strong arm approach is not a recipe for long term success; 4.       Unless a deal is basically fair to both parties and unless both parties get something valuable out of the deal, short term gains for the stronger party often turn into long term problems; 5.       In the best/most successful deals neither side will get 100% of what they want but both parties must get something of value.   Albert Einstein said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.” I am not a professional politician who is part of the D,C. insanity.  My contracting experience and perspective is what is lacking in Washington and that is what I will bring to the table, an ability to negotiate with a party that does not share my perspective.

 

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StarSection 7: Candidates for US House, Congressional District 3

 

E. BlumenauerEarl Blumenauer www.earlblumenauer.com  (DEM)   

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

There are many things that we can do to improve the tax system:Pass a revenue neutral carbon tax to more effectively provide incentives for clean energy and discourage pollution. The revenues should be used to adjust the tax code, reducing the burdens on small business and low and moderate income families by reducing the payroll tax and fixing the Social Security deficit.Every effort should be made to repeal, simplify, or consolidate complicated provisions. Provisions like child care tax credits, earned income tax credits, and education credits could be more effective and more broadly available if they were simplified.Reverse Republican’s deliberate underfunding of the IRS which results in less help for taxpayers. (Sixty percent of the calls were dropped last year.) With fewer audits, roughly $400 billion dollars a year escapes taxation which puts the burden on the rest of America with either higher taxes, lower services or both.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

The most important thing Congress can do to deal with climate change is to enact a revenue-neutral carbon tax which would be more effective than some of the existing incentives.We should also implement President Obama’s carbon policies, invest more in renewable energy sources and research, be more aggressive with energy efficiency starting with the federal government and our schools. We should promote the support under the next Farm Bill for helping farmers change their practices of cultivation and livestock to reduce the enormous carbon footprint of that sector. They can do more and should be helped to do so.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

Model the behavior you expect from others; do not engage in hyper-partisan insulting behavior.Find areas of bipartisan common interest on second and third-tier issues that will make a difference. This is what I have done with work on rebuilding and renewing America. I have bipartisan legislation in several areas including healthcare reform, reforming marijuana laws and international water and sanitation, that people like to work on, can actually pass and make a difference.Finally, treat colleagues as real people and try and help them. For years I have sent a personal six page letter to all new members of Congress in both parties with suggestions to help them and their families cope with the sometimes overwhelming pressures of Congressional service. This is an example of how to change the tone and bridge divides.

David W Walker www.humaucracy.com  (I)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

Simplify the corporate tax code.  Lower the top rate.  Create a tax free rate for first 100k of income for all/any small business.  Eliminate Deductibles.    Individual Tax Code.  Simplify.  Eliminate all current deductibles/loop holes  Triple the Single S. No replies. tandard Deductible for all individuals.  The Financial Industry pulls too much capital from the real economy.  Plus, it adds catastrophic risk to all Americans.  Sp, introduce a financial transaction levy to return as loans and wage support to business and workers.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

Congress must begin to remove the Republicans and Democrat parties from their position of stewardship over our government.  The Rs& Ds are no longer capable of leading the USA.  They can only harm the American people.  Oust the Republican & Democrats by never voting for a Democrat or Republican candidate in any present or future local, state or federal election.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

Begin the general call for “Never cast a Vote for any candidate of the a Democrat & Republican party.  The immediate harm and continuing threat caused by the Republican and Democrat parties to our government, institutions & American way of life is at a critical level.  These two moribund institutions no longer represents any voter of any stripe.  Republicans and Democrats only divide our citizens, serve their personal Leadership PACs and have turned the greatest democracy into a third rate, banana republic whose common currency is disenfranchisement of “We the People.”  Oust Republicans…Oust Democrats…Stop the Duopoly…Stop the DEMUBLICANS!

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StarSection 8: Candidates for US House, Congressional District 4

 

A. RobinsonArt Robinson www.artforcongress.com  (REP)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

Tax collection should be simplified, and Congressional manipulation of the tax system to serve special interests in return for campaign cash and other favors for members of Congress should be eliminated.   Tax collection should include disclosure provisions so that tax payers have full knowledge of the taxes they are paying. Hidden taxation should be eliminated.   Many less affluent citizens (and voters) are misled to believe that they pay very low taxes when, in fact, they are very heavily taxed.   The prices paid for food, shelter, clothing, and other necessities contain large cumulative taxes of those who produce these items. Food prices include the taxes paid by farmers, truckers, food sellers, and many other people whose work makes food available. Price listings should include listings of the tax percentage in the price.   Each dollar belonging to a poorer citizen is far more valuable to him than it is to a more affluent citizen, so hidden taxation hurts that person even more.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

Congress should avoid passing laws that decrease our nation’s ability to cope with climate change. This is especially true for our major energy industries, which are based on coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear energy, hydroelectric, and solar fuels.    There are proposals for passive technologies that could partially increase or decrease the amounts of sunlight hitting the Earth and other geo-engineering ideas, but the scientific climate records show that changes in climate are, at present, largely beyond human control.    With, however, abundant amounts of energy and common sense use of that energy to enhance the protection of people from effects of harmful climate variations, we can largely mitigate negative effects and enhance positive effects from climate change.   Energy is the key requirement for all technology. As we endeavor to technologically enhance our environment and increase our safety, the more inexpensive useable energy we produce, the more effective we can be.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

Polarization in Congress is caused, in large part, by the efforts of some of the members to depart from their oaths of office, which promise to uphold our Constitution. We have a Constitutional Republic. This has made possible our wonderful nation.    Departures from the Constitution are largely by career politicians who view their memberships in Congress as opportunities to enhance their own personal wealth and power, rather than as opportunities for public service. When members of Congress stay in office too long, they are more likely to have this view.   Progress to “depolarize” Congress can be made by working most closely with those members who, regardless of their political party or political persuasions, truly want to be honest public servants. Such members are found in both political parties. If they work together, Congressional polarization will decrease.

J. PerkinsJo Rae Perkins  www.perkins4oregon.com  (REP)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

On the federal level: I support a Constitutional Amendment that will eliminate all personal income and business profit taxes and implements a federal sales tax. This would be capped at 10% and cannot be increased.  The rate would decrease as federal spending decreases and the federal debt and deficit are reduced or paid off.  This provides an incentive for the people to force the federal government to stop wasteful spending. When debt has accrued and must be paid off, our income taxes increase, giving the people less disable income. On the other side, as the debts and deficit are paid off, our spendable income will increase.   Because most people spend and do not save, they would spend the additional money in their paycheck / bank account, increasing the tax revenues.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

Nothing. We cannot control the climate. It changes, it is cyclical. Climate change is rooted in the U.N. Agenda 21. Read it for yourselves

  1. Find the common ground we agree upon. 2. Stop creating problems that need solving.

 

P. DeFazioPeter A DeFazio  www.defazioforcongress.com  (DEM)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

First, we should raise the capital gains tax rate. People who work for wages, such as teachers and firefighters, shouldn’t have to pay higher taxes compared to people who invest for a living.  Next we should end tax breaks for companies that outsource American jobs, and close all overseas incentives, loopholes and tax havens so multinational corporations cannot dodge their tax responsibility. To help boost domestic production, we should also lower the tax rate for domestic corporations which are paying the maximum tax rate.  Finally, we should impose a small speculator tax on high volume non-productive stock trading to help stop the reckless gambling on Wall Street that led to the 2008 financial collapse. A financial transaction tax  would raise about $35 billion a year which could be invested in road and bridge construction that would put people to work, and financial aid programs so more students could afford post-secondary education.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

The science is clear, if we don’t take action, our planet will be in serious peril. We need a strong federal mandate to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  We don’t need a new speculative cap and trade market, or complex financial instruments that involve hedge funds and Wall Street bankers to do it. The Environmental Protection Agency already has taken action under the Clean Air Act to decrease emissions from coal and natural gas power plants by creating and enforcing responsible, nationwide, flexible emissions standards. The rules are under attack in the Republican Congress and I have stood firm to prevent their repeal.  Congress should end subsidies for wealthy oil companies, reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and invest in alternative and renewable energy technologies.   In addition, Congress should increase funding for climate science and federal programs that gather critical data on the atmosphere.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

First and foremost, we must limit the influence of special interest money in our elections which has over time, warped our political system, giving the wealthy and well-connected a stronger voice than everyday Americans.  That means overturning the Supreme Court decision, Citizens United v FEC, which dismissed 100 years of legal precedent and gave special interest and billionaire donors free rein to spend unlimited amounts of money without disclosure to influence elections.  I support legislation that would provide public financing of federal elections. Public matching funds and spending limits would allow campaigns to run on small dollar donations rather than money from special interests.  We also must restore a more proportional representation in the House of Representatives and limit the partisan gerrymandering of congressional redistricting. In the 2012 election, although Democrats received 1.4 million more votes for House candidates, Republicans won a 33 seat margin in the House.

Joseph McKinney.  (DEM)  No response

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StarSection 9: Candidates for US House, Congressional District 5

Earl D Rainey  earldrainey@gmail.com  (REP)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

I have just a few ideas, but nothing substantial yet. I’m working on an idea of an equal tax for tax payers. And a corporate tax for businesses. But I do see the possibility of a lowering of taxes as unneeded federal and state agencies are shut down.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

I believe climate change has been blown out of proportion by liberals, lobbyist, and special interest groups. It’s truly sad all these groups have falsified information to make a buck. Real science has proven that earth is going through a warming cycle now. Once the cycle is finished, we will cool off. We as humans need to learn to accept that.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

Redistricting would be a good start. Metropolitan Oregon has been making the decisions for far too long. This is totally unfair to rural Oregonian’s who don’t think they are being heard.

Colm Willis.  (REP)  No response
B. WestBen West  www.benwestfororegon.com  (REP)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

We can do a lot to change the structure of the tax system, and it needs to be a priority in the next Congress.  You shouldn’t have to hire a team of accountants to file your taxes.  We need to simplify the tax code and drastically lower the individual rates.  I want to ensure that we can keep deductions for mortgages, medical expenses, student loans and fees, and adoption credits.  We need to make our corporate taxes amongst the lowest in the world.  That’s how jobs are created.  Thanks to Obamacare, small businesses can be taxed at almost 40 percent! We need to work to lower these rates and make them uniform across the board.  By doing this we can simplify the structure so businesses can invest in expansion, not their books.  By increasing the number of people working in quality jobs, we are able to expand the tax base and lower rates across the board.  By reforming the tax code the right way, we can grow the economy, reduce the burden on families and start paying down the debt.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

As Oregonians, we live in one of the most beautiful states in the nation.  From the coast, through the vast forestry to the mountains, we are blessed.  It is because of the abundance of these natural resources that countless families are able to put food on the table every night. We have the ability to utilize these resources and the responsibility to preserve them for future generations.  While I believe climate change is a concern, I do not believe it is the responsibility of Congress to impose laws that mandate a one-size-fits-all cap on carbon emissions, because every state is different.  Congress should be passing legislation that promotes cleaner sources of energy that help create jobs, not just picking winners and losers.  Thinking globally, as your Congressman, I will advocate to the President the importance of countries such as China and India begin to implement even minimal emission standards and work towards reaching the high standards we already have in place.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

America seems more polarized than ever, but in reality it’s the politicians that are at odds, not the voters. Oregonians want representatives who work for local interests instead of becoming mired in partisan gridlock. The citizens of the 5th District work, live and collaborate together every day. Why can’t we expect the same from Congress?   Oregon needs representation that is not only conservative but also effective.  If I am fortunate enough to be elected, I will be able to work with leadership and with Chairman Walden to help do what is best for Oregon.  I believe in conservative solutions to America’s most pressing issues, but more than that I believe in fighting for Oregon. I’m not a career politician, and unlike Kurt Schrader I’m not beholden to special interests.  We deserve an advocate who will do what it takes to get what’s best for Oregon, and I believe that is me.

S. AllenSeth Allan  www.sethallan.com  (REP)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

A simple flat tax. I would advocate a rate of no more than 15% for middle class Americans ( those making from $30,000 to $150,000 per year).

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

Climate change is natural and I would not look to allocate money to try and combat it.  I do, however, advocate for clean water and clean air. Congress needs to ensure that proper levels of funding are a given to maintain water and sewage systems so we avoid crises like that in Flint, Michigan.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

I will always look for common ground with Democrats. This should be the first objective. I believe that it is necessary to compromise on policy proposals. However, I will not compromise core values. Constitutional freedoms must be upheld at all costs.

Kurt Schrader.  (DEM)  No response
D. McTeagueDave McTeague  www.mcteagueforcongress.com  (DEM)

Question 1: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

Senator Bernie Sanders says, “The issue of wealth and income inequality is the great moral issue of our time, it is the great economic issue of our time, and it is the great political issue of our time… America now has more wealth and income inequality than any major developed country on earth, and the gap between the very rich and everyone else is wider than at any time since the 1920s.”  To fund the education and social programs necessary to address the vast wealth inequality: We must ask the wealthy and large corporations to pay their fair share in taxes. We must stop corporations from shifting their profits and jobs overseas to avoid paying U.S. income taxes. I support a progressive estate tax on the top 0.3 percent of Americans who inherit more than $3.5 million.  We need to tax Wall Street speculators who caused millions of Americans to lose their jobs, homes, and life savings.

Question 2: What should Congress do to deal with climate change?

Our current energy policy benefits big oil companies like Exxon, BP, and Shell at the expense of average Americans.  We must: 1) Cut U.S. carbon pollution by 40 percent by 2030 and by over 80 percent by 2050 by putting a tax on carbon pollution, 2) Repeal fossil fuel subsidies and make massive investments in energy efficiency and clean, sustainable energy such as wind and solar power. 3) Create a Clean-Energy Workforce of 10 million good-paying jobs by creating a 100% clean energy system.  We should work towards a completely nuclear-free clean energy system for electricity, heating, and transportation. This is entirely possible and affordable.  It will create millions of green energy jobs. Congressman Schrader has taken PAC contributions from nuclear and energy corporations and interests. As a State Representative I sponsored and passed state legislation extending Oregon residential solar and alternative energy credits. We must stop fracking and promote energy efficiency instead.

Question 3: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

Most of all we must repeal Citizens United and move toward public campaign financing or other ways for voters to get the information they need to make informed decisions. Polarization won’t be solved unless we reform our CORRUPT CAMPAIGN FINANCE SYSTEM. A review of Cong. Schrader’s hundreds of PAC contributions illustrates how the lobbyists influence Congress to vote their way.  As a state legislator, I successfully worked with all sides to fashion good legislation. Mutual respect and an ability to set aside differences is not that hard. You don’t have compromise your principles or be less progressive to work together for the common good.

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StarSection 10: Candidates for Oregon Governor

 

  • Term= 4 years
  • Salary= $98,600

Candidates

 

B. CuffBruce Cuff  www.time4cuff.org  (REP)

Question 1: How would you improve transparency in government?

Fill freedom of information requests from the public in a timely manner. Publish State Audits of departments Online so Taxpayers can see where their money is being spent. Partner with state employees to do things more efficiently and reward them for ideas. Develop better online search engines so the public can find specific information about what state workers, administrators and elected officials are paid along with a better way of presenting – “where is the money being spent?”

Question 2: How would you improve public education (pre-K through college) in Oregon?

Develop a voucher system where parents get 70% ($7000) of what the state is currently spending on average per student ($10,000) and allow them to put it toward any private or public school they wish. Encourage Teachers to form Private Co-operatives school that could utilize and rent Church building, or other buildings to have these Private Schools. Promotes entrepreneurial enterprises that will allow teachers and parents greater freedom over education options – Disciple in the schools, whose morality is being taught (parents and teachers rather than politically correctness. Tired of immorality being taught under the guise of diversity). Instant 30%  saving and accoutability. 50% of Personal Income Tax to be sent directly back to the counties, no strings attached, to support schools, public safety or infrastructure needs.

Question 3: How would you ensure that everyone who wants a job can find one?

Eliminate $1 Billion dollar Business tax and $800,000 Property Taxes on Business and make OREGON the BUSINESS FRIENDLY STATE. More business means more jobs. The $1.8 Billion dollar in taxes NOT PAID by business would quickly be made up by the amount of personal income tax the new employees will pay. This will make Oregon Business the MOST COMPETITIVE in this Global economy, causing business to WANT to local in Oregon.

B. NiemeyerBob Niemeyer www.bobniemeyer.com  (REP)

Question 1: How would you improve transparency in government?

We can-not have transparency in government as long as the government has the attitude that the people need to be “taken care of” or “protected from themselves”. An attitude that has taken over the thinking in every facet of government and is really behind what has gone on with all of the new controls and regulations.  The only way to get transparency is to decrease the size of government so that the people can again be responsible for their own actions and future.  I personally look at the problem with transparency from two different perspectives. One; “You can’t fix stupid”. (I know this is a cliché) With the Government doing so much regulation and trying to control every aspect of life and business in some kind of misguided effort to protect us all from ourselves, I feel like the government is calling us all stupid. And as far as the Government is concerned, there is no difference between stupid and making a better future for ourselves. Two; “People want to be Independent”. Period.  Question 2: How would you improve public education (pre-K through college) in Oregon?

Question 2: How would you improve public education (pre-K through college) in Oregon?

Charter schools are the answer at this point in time. Charter schools would allow for the creation of different kinds of schools that can use different teaching techniques to get through to children so that when they graduate and move out into the real world, they will have the skills necessary to be a productive member of society.   The teachers of Oregon need to be trained in how to recognize the differences between children and what teaching techniques work the best for any given child. The teachers of Oregon need to have all of the teaching techniques available for use on all of the students along with a place to send like-minded students to different charter schools. Teaching needs to be elevated back to a Profession instead of babysitting. And as a Profession, Teachers are more valuable than administrators.   There has never been a such thing as a “Common Core” in teaching. Only “Common Goals”. Common Core must be thrown out of our schools. The very idea that such a putrid teachi

Question 3: How would you ensure that everyone who wants a job can find one?

Cut the size of government and jobs will follow. Stop government activities that are not government responsibilities and jobs will follow. End regulations that are not based on law enforcement and jobs will follow.   Businesses exist for the purpose of making money. Making money is why we work. Making money for your employer really is the only way to be able to get health care, housing, or even food. We the People need to realize that making money is a necessity for getting anything.  You want jobs, get rid of the minimum wage, lower taxes on businesses if not eliminate them, and stop to over regulation of every aspect of business. The people need to relearn that their value to business is based on how much money your employer can make with their help.  Stop giving away money that belongs to our ancestors.  Unemployment  benefits stop at 13 weeks. No more Federal money.  Rebuild Oregon’s educational system so our children will have a higher value in the job market.

Bob Forthan.  (REP)  No response
B. PierceBud Pierce  www.budpierce.com  (REP)

Question 1: How would you improve transparency in government?

Mandate that the governor’s office, and all government agencies, release requested information to the press and citizens at no financial cost.

Question 2: How would you improve public education (pre-K through college) in Oregon?

Use the 1993 Massachusetts Education Reform act, which lifted Massachusetts schools from the bottom to the top in the nation and world, as a template for education reform in Oregon.  Develop a robust and high quality career technical education program for all qualified public school students who wish such education.

Question 3: How would you ensure that everyone who wants a job can find one?

Listening to industry in the private sector and advocating for public policies that grow the economy and add jobs, by enhancing growth in manufacturing and in natural resource based jobs (with an emphasis on timber), and by increasing infrastructure jobs by building roads, bridges, ports, and rail service.

Allen Alley.   (REP) See info added after deadlines at www.Vote411.org.
K. BrownKate Brown  www.katebrownfororegon.com  (DEM)

Question 1: How would you improve transparency in government?

Bringing greater transparency to State government is one of my highest priorities.  In the most recent legislative session, I am proud to have passed a bill requiring lobbyists to disclose on a publicly available website who they work for and what they are getting paid to do that work.  One of the first things I did after being sworn in as Governor was to pass an ethics package designed to bring both more accountability and more transparency to our government.  But I know that there is more work to do.  I believe strongly that it shouldn’t be easier to Section a Fed Ex package than it is to find out what your government is doing.  That is why I intend to create a Pubic Records Advocate – so that an independent entity can make public records available in a way that is faster, fairer and consistent.

Question 2: How would you improve public education (pre-K through college) in Oregon?

It is my dream that all of Oregon’s students have access to a seamless system of education that takes them from cradle to career.  I want every one of our students to complete high school with a plan, whether that be college, post-secondary, job-training, or entering the work force.  And that education system should prepare them for the jobs of the future.  Of course, more of our students must graduate from high school, and that is why I have created a cabinet-level Education Innovation officer who will report directly to me, and will help me to identify the resources that we need to ensure that we raise our graduation rates.  Finally, it is my hope that we will shrink the opportunity gap that, today, starts early and makes it harder every year for that student to catch up.  We’ve started that work with our historic i$7.4 billion investment in education, particularly early childhood education, that we made in the 2015 session, but there is still much work to do.

Question 3: How would you ensure that everyone who wants a job can find one?

First, I will partner with business to continue our economic recovery statewide by helping Oregon companies large and small to expand, creating more good jobs for Oregonians. Because we know that 70 percent of jobs are created when existing businesses grow, it’s important that Business Oregon, the state’s economic development agency, continue its mission to ‘grow our own’, making sure businesses are able to thrive in Oregon. Our State should also cultivate more long-term partnerships between public education and the private sector to develop the highly skilled workforce our businesses need and to help ensure good-paying jobs for Oregonians.  In addition to workforce development, it is incumbent upon the state to make it as easy as possible to start or expand a business in Oregon, by streamlining regulation and cutting red tape. In the recent legislative session, I passed legislation to expand the Office of the Small Business Advocate to serve more of our job-creating small businesses.

Julian Bell.   (DEM)  See info added after deadlines at www.Vote411.org.
Chet Chance.  (DEM)  No response
Kevin M Forsythe.  (DEM)  No response
D. StaufferDave Stauffer  staufent@live.com  (DEM)

Question 1: How would you improve transparency in government?

By following the present laws on government transparency.

Question 2: How would you improve public education (pre-K through college) in Oregon?

I would seek to finance the improvements that are recommended by the best educational minds in Oregon.

Question 3: How would you ensure that everyone who wants a job can find one?

My campaign is based on my promise to create 10,000 jobs in Morrow and Umatilla counties, and many more jobs at the headwaters of the Rogue River and the Klamath River, and in eastern Oregon, Washington, and California. My river-bottom pipeline invention (patent pending) will deliver fresh water to those miles and miles of badlands that are found in the eastern parts of those states. In addition to providing water, the same pipelines will be a great source of non-polluting hydro-electric power.  The pipelines will also control flooding so that, eventually, dams may be breached and fish runs up the rivers can return to their pre-dam levels.  Everyone who wants a job will be able to find one–particularly fishermen and fisherwomen, farmers, and workers in any businesses that use electricity.

Steve Johnson.  (DEM)  No response
P. BarneyPatrick Barney  patrickbarney4governor@yahoo.com  (I)

Question 1: How would you improve transparency in government?

By being open with what I’m doing with my position. I want to show the people where their tax dollars are going & what we are doing to improve conditions all over the state.

Question 2: How would you improve public education (pre-K through college) in Oregon?

I want to look at the tax money the state is getting & where it is going to. I want to take money that could be put to better use elsewhere & put it towards those things.

Question 3: How would you ensure that everyone who wants a job can find one?

I want to figure out a way to create more Oregon jobs. I have construction ideas that could fix more than just creating jobs. I also have an idea of how to create more customer service jobs. I believe the more jobs we have the easier it would be for someone to get hired somewhere.

Cliff Thomason.  (I)  No response

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StarSection 11: Candidates for Oregon Attorney General

 

Term= 4 years

Salary= $82,200

Candidates

D. CroweDaniel Zene Crowe  www.oregonslawyer.org  (REP)

Question 1: How would you protect Oregonians against online criminals?

We must protect our kids from online predators more effectively.  I’ll expand the Oregon Department of Justice Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, which focuses on investigating, prosecuting and preventing the sexual exploitation of children on the internet.   We must do more to prevent the type of online fraud that exploits the essential kindness and decency of Oregonians, and targets our older population mercilessly. I’ll focus on protecting seniors from online elder abuse.  Because of the “borderless” nature of online crime, our Attorney General needs to form partnerships with other law enforcement entities, both in other states, at the federal level, and overseas.  With my extensive experience in synchronizing governmental agencies through my military service as the lawyer for U.S. European Command’s Joint Interagency Control Group, I have the type of experience in coordinating governmental agencies and other stakeholders to protect Oregonians from online threats.

Question 2: How would you ensure that charities do what they say they do?

In the past month, we have seen a scandal explode at the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) where the CEO and a subordinate were forced to resign after disclosures of inappropriate spending on cushy benefits for the bosses of that organization. That’s extremely disappointing to Oregon’s charitable contributors who might now think twice about giving to a nonprofit.  As the Attorney General, I’ll work to make sure that Oregon’s nonprofits are more transparent.  We can do that by making public records more easily available online.  We need to work with stakeholders like the Nonprofit Association of Oregon to create a method for validating the efficacy of nonprofits in our state. I’ll ensure that we use our audit capability when it’s suspected that a nonprofit is committing fraud or abusing donors.  Lastly, we need to make sure that nonprofits are operating within the scope of their mission and within the designation under which they’ve been approved to operate.

Question 3: How would you ensure that public records are easily available to the public?

It’s outrageous that Oregon was recently graded an “F” for transparency and public records.  As our next Attorney General, I’m committed to providing Oregonians with a more accessible government.  Public records were created and retained with tax dollars.  It is no longer acceptable that the state delay records or use fees to dissuade record seekers. The Department of Justice needs a culture shift.  We need to ensure the public’s right to know, which will expand trust in government by exposing fraud, waste, and abuse.  The public also needs to be better apprised of the role of the agency, and the tactics that are used.  The recent allegations of the DOJ spying on Twitter users posting the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag erodes trust and is a potential violation of people’s First Amendment Rights.  The agency must be more transparent about its actions, balancing the public’s right to know with public safety in a manner that doesn’t given an undue advantage to the government over its citizens.

E. RosenblumEllen Rosenblum  www.ellenrosenblum.com  (DEM)

Question 1: How would you protect Oregonians against online criminals?

I have made protecting the most vulnerable my top priority. The most effective way to protect against online criminals is to educate Oregonians as to how to identify online scams and frauds before the damage is done—in other words, to prevent the crimes from occurring in the first place. This is particularly important with the vulnerable elderly, which is why I go around the state conducting “scam jams” and why I fought for a new Elder Abuse Unit in my Criminal Justice Division. I also initiated a policy measure to protect the data of K–12 students who use online educational programs in the classroom. The Oregon Department of Justice (DOJ) Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force pursues cases involving child pornography and the trafficking of children. The Task Force also provides interactive, educational programs to equip teachers and parents with the tools needed to protect kids who use the Internet.

Question 2: How would you ensure that charities do what they say they do?

As the Attorney General, my office has statutory and common-law authority over charitable assets in Oregon. Charitable trusts must give our office advance notice of any changes to the terms of an applicable fiduciary, and organizations such as nonprofit hospitals are required to obtain approval before transferring assets to unrelated organizations. We oversee the activities of Oregon’s charitable organizations at the DOJ Charitable Activities Section, which investigates potential violations of state law and, if necessary, takes legal action against delinquent charitable organizations. We spearheaded a law that requires charities to demonstrate that at least 30% of their donor proceeds go to the charitable purpose; if not, their donors do not receive the state charitable tax deduction for the donation. This new law has resulted in the worst charities stopping their solicitations in Oregon—a result we had hoped for.

Question 3: How would you ensure that public records are easily available to the public?

I take the issue of government transparency very seriously. Last October, in an ongoing effort to improve public-records laws, I announced the formation of my Public Records Law Reform Task Force, whose purpose is to review current transparency laws and recommend improvements. Public records need to be made available more quickly, more cheaply, and with fewer (and easier-to-find) exemptions. My task force is addressing all three of these issues and we hope to have some concrete policy proposals for the 2017 legislative session. Current law allows those who are denied public records to petition the Attorney General or District Attorney to issue a Public Records Order. Open-government laws in Oregon provide transparency as to how local, regional, and state governments spend taxpayer money, and at the end of each two-year legislative session, the Attorney General’s office makes available an up-to-date manual, which details current transparency laws in our state.

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StarSection 12: Candidates for Oregon Secretary of State

 

  • Term= 4 years
  • Salary= $77,000

Candidates

Sid Leiken www.sidleiken.org  (REP)

Question 1: Should the Audits Division remain in the Secretary of State’s office?  Why or why not?

The chief auditor of the state should continue to be a non-partisan position.  If the Secretary of State’s office is doing their audits, both performance and financial, correctly then the person holding the SOS office will need to approve their work plans.  The most important part of this process is to make sure that the audits will continue to be transparent and the auditors themselves will be able to perform their jobs without feeling like there is political pressure.  I personally have extensive experience in providing direct oversight to Lane County’s financial and performance auditors.  I will continue to make sure we hire an experienced chief auditor and continue the tradition of Gary Blackmer, retired chief auditor, of being an award winner.

Question 2: What are your proposals to improve Oregon government functions?

If you look at the audit division, audits have been performed and have been performed professionally.  I would like to introduce a legislative concept that will provide the Secretary of State’s office, not just the ability to perform the audit, but to make sure that the departments that have been audited will be required to make the actual recommendation.  I have this ability at Lane County as a Commissioner, where an audit has been performed and recommendations are made, then direction is made to carry out the recommendations.  A large part missing at the state level.

Question 3: What could you do as Secretary of State to ensure campaign contribution transparency to the public?

It will be challenging until the Oregon Supreme Court reverses it decision that unlimited campaign contribution is part of free speech.  If we are to ensure transparency then this needs to be done throughout all entities in Oregon, business, unions, and personal.  If this is going to happen then we also need to clamp down on the financing of Super PAC’s.  Candidate lose their entire messaging because Super PAC’s can create their own messaging without the candidates knowledge or approval.  I find these types of PACS to have the most harm on campaigns, from both the right and the left, as they are not beholden to anyone.  We need to work together to come up with common sense solutions.

D. RichardsonDennis Richardson   www.dennisrichardson.com  (REP)

Question 1: Should the Audits Division remain in the Secretary of State’s office?  Why or why not?

The drafters of the Oregon Constitution created and intended the office of the Secretary of State to be free from political influence from the Executive or Legislative branches.  The Audits Division of the Secretary of State’s office should function as an independent government accountability office, similar to the GAO in the federal government. Whether or not the Audits Division fulfills its opportunity to be Oregon’s independent GAO depends on the willingness of the Secretary to serve the interests of the people and not his/her party.

Question 2: What are your proposals to improve Oregon government functions?

I propose the Audits Division (1.) perform financial and performance audits and report to the Legislature and the Governor its findings on (a.) why Oregon’s lowest performing schools are failing, and (b.) what happened to tax dollars wasted on programs like Cover Oregon and the Columbia River Crossing; and (2.) institute “alongside audits” at the beginning of large scale projects, identify problems early and prevent project failures that have repeatedly cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars without such accountability.  As Secretary of State I will make specific recommendations to the Legislature and the Governor relating to businesses and elections.  I will revise and implement an effective process for government workers to report fraud, waste and abuse without fear of retaliation that could cost them their jobs.  I will also increase government transparency by improving digital access to public records.

Question 3: What could you do as Secretary of State to ensure campaign contribution transparency to the public?

To ensure more transparent campaign finance the Secretary of State Elections Division should eliminate the current practice of allowing small donations or expenditures to be combined as “miscellaneous cash contributions” or “miscellaneous expenditures.” In the 2013-14 campaign cycle, more than $13 million in combined contributions and expenditures were recorded by political action committees (PAC’s). This pooling was done without transparency to voters regarding the sources of those dollars, including whether such donations came from out-of-state donors and whether such expenditures were a legal use of campaign contributions.   I also believe we need (1.) more scrutiny on PAC-to-PAC “pass through contributions” and (2.) additional PAC audits.  Finally, the Secretary of State should perform spot audits on PAC’s and not merely respond to complaints. Such reforms can be easily implemented with little or no statutory revision.

B. AvakianBrad Avakian  www.bradavakian.com  (DEM)

Question 1: Should the Audits Division remain in the Secretary of State’s office?  Why or why not?

Brad Avakian has a proven record of increasing accountability and transparency that he will build upon as Secretary of State. As Labor Commissioner, Brad Avakian has held corporations and state agencies accountable for abusive labor practices, discrimination, and fraud. As Secretary of State, Avakian will make Oregon a national model for good governance.  The Avakian Plan: Hold Corporations Accountable Through Audits Use the audits division of the Secretary of State’s office to review the policies of corporations that do business with the state. These audits will ensure contractors are paying the minimum wage, prevailing wage, and following equal pay and other employment laws. This will create a level playing field for businesses that play by the rules while preventing others from winning bids by short-changing their workers.

Question 2: What are your proposals to improve Oregon government functions?

The Avakian Plan: Hold Corporations Accountable Through Audits The Secretary of State’s office can be used to hold corporations accountable for abuses, and reward businesses who are playing by the rules. The office is also responsible for making state information accessible, and allowing the public to benefit from the wealth of knowledge stored in the State Archives.  Civic Engagement Oregon has a responsibility to teach the next generation the importance and process of participation in our democracy. The Secretary of State can be a leader in fostering a commitment to civics education in our public schools as well as giving Oregon children an opportunity to learn the process of voting. Brad Avakian has a proven record in bringing people together to strengthen our public schools. As Secretary of State, Avakian will create the partnership to return civics education as part of the curriculum and create the Oregon Youth Vote.

Question 3: What could you do as Secretary of State to ensure campaign contribution transparency to the public?

The tsunami of out of state corporate wealth washes out the voices of Oregonians. A level playing field is established only with laws that limit huge corporate influence and allows individuals through small donor PACs to be heard.  I will present the bill for campaign finance limits and help build the coalition to pass it.   I support amending Oregon’s Constitution so that we can enact reasonable limits. Money isn’t speech – and corporations aren’t people. Citizens United is one of the most wrongheaded decisions in recent memory. It also shouldn’t be used as an excuse to do nothing. I will pursue legislation that both accomplishes the goal of reducing the power of big money in our politics and that can withstand the inevitable legal challenges.

R. DevlinRichard Devlin  www.devlinfororegon.com  (DEM)

Question 1: Should the Audits Division remain in the Secretary of State’s office?  Why or why not?

I firmly believe that the Audits Division should remain under the direct control of the Secretary of State. It is important that the audit function be controlled by a single statewide official. This will provide more independence than if it was broadly under the control of the executive branch or the legislative branch. Audit recommendations should be factually based and not subject to political concerns that the audit’s findings may not reflect well on a current administration or legislatively enacted policies. Article VI Sec 2 of the Oregon Constitution grants the sole power of auditing to the Secretary of State. Additionally, a 1979 Attorney General advisory opinion (No. 7759) clarified that the Legislative Assembly may not “delegate any aspect of the audit function assigned to the Secretary of State… to any other branch of state government.” This interpretation of the law not only aligns with my beliefs, but would make it challenging to reassign this responsibility.

Question 2: What are your proposals to improve Oregon government functions?

The Secretary of State can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of government functions through the audit process. While financial audits and information technology audits are at the core of the audit function, performance audits are the primary tool the Secretary of State has to improve state government. Below are examples of four areas I’d address: 1. Determine the best practices that need to be instituted and the most appropriate use of resources to improve high school graduation rates. 2. Determine which practices and programs result in the highest reduction in recidivism for adult offenders. 3. Review the efficacy of current public instituted incentives to foster economic development and encourage those that are effective and recommend the reduction or elimination of those that are not. 4. Determine the efficacy of current programs to move families out of poverty and recommend increased investment in those that are effective and reductions or elimination of those that are not.

Question 3: What could you do as Secretary of State to ensure campaign contribution transparency to the public?

Having participated in the creation of Orestar (Oregon Elections System for Sectioning and Reporting), I will tell you it is one of the best state campaign finance transparency websites. However, its major failing is that it is not as user friendly as it should be. The system is used by campaigns to Section expenditures, candidates as a fundraising tool, and the press to report on the process. What all these parties have in common is they have learned over time the intricacies of the system and can manipulate its various search functions to locate the information they need. While this system is necessary to Section and accurately report contributions and expenditures, a more intuitive system would be beneficial to the public. This system would not be a replacement for the current system and public access to the current system would be maintained. However, a system that could generate a report on a candidate based on some commonly accepted parameters could be more useful to the public.

V. HoyleVal Hoyle  www.valhoyle.com  (DEM)

Question 1: Should the Audits Division remain in the Secretary of State’s office?  Why or why not?

I absolutely believe that audits should remain a part of the Secretary of State’s office. The people of Oregon trust the Secretary of State to be a fair and unbiased arbiter of our elections, and those same qualities play an important role in the Audits Division. We want elections that are run fairly and openly, and  we  want to make sure that our government is run the same way. The Secretary of State is the perfect position to take on those responsibilities and as Oregon’s Secretary of State I am committed to using the audits to increase government transparency and accountability so that every Oregonian receives the most benefits from every dollar we spend.

Question 2: What are your proposals to improve Oregon government functions?

Oregonians trust us to spend their hard-earned tax dollars on the programs that will most help our state – with that in mind, I will use the audit function of the Secretary of State’s office to find inefficiencies and savings in all program areas of government, so we can take those funds and reinvest in our top priorities like our public schools. During my time as House Majority Leader, we increased funding for education to historic levels because we had the priorities of Oregon’s working families in mind. As Secretary of State, I will use those same priorities to break down barriers to voter participation, get big money out of politics, and to increase government transparency.

Question 3: What could you do as Secretary of State to ensure campaign contribution transparency to the public?

Oregon has one of the more transparent campaign finance systems in the country, there are many ways that we could do a better job. The first is to make the Oregon Election System for Sectioning and Reporting (ORESTAR) easier to navigate and more consumer friendly. The system is good if you know how to use it but it isn’t intuitive. The second is to work to ensure that the money spent in independent expenditures is as easy to find as direct contributions. Finally, I would support a law similar to what California requires, which is that candidates must disclose the major donors to their campaigns on their campaign material or website. Until the Oregon Constitution is changed or the Citizen’s United is overturned, we will not be able to limit campaign donations. I will continue to fight for campaign contribution limits that allow for people to have a voice in the political process and limit the influence of big money in politics.

P. WellsPaul Damian Wells  www.thekeel.org  (I)

Question 1: Should the Audits Division remain in the Secretary of State’s office?  Why or why not?

When the general election rolls around, most Democrats (38%) will vote for the Democratic candidate and most Republicans (30%) will vote for the Republican candidate. Issues such as conducting audits and campaign finance don’t matter to these voters – just the party name on the ballot. I don’t believe any candidate for Secretary of State has ever openly challenged the constitutionality of partisan elections. It remains to be seen if Independents (29%) will support such a candidate. I think it unlikely that Independent voters will care much about audits and campaign finance either. In 2008 and again in 2014, Oregonians voted on initiative petitions to abolish partisan elections. Both times the result was the same. 2/3 against and 1/3 for. 33% of the vote is not enough to pass an initiative petition but it may be enough to win a three-way race for Secretary of State.

Question 2: What are your proposals to improve Oregon government functions?

     Partisan Elections in Oregon are based on a “Separate but Equal” doctrine. Major Party candidates are subsidized while Minor Party and Independent Candidates are restricted. If elected, I intend to openly challenge the Constitutionality of Partisan Elections in Oregon. As Oregon’s Chief Elections Officer, I believe I can force a full and fair review by our courts. This is something that cannot be accomplished by an individual candidate or voter.      The Legislature has adopted not one – but two different election schemes. Closed partisan primaries are used for most Federal and State offices. An open Top-Two primary is used for all non-partisan offices. The U.S. Supreme court has ruled that, when a state adopts more than one standard or procedure for conducting elections, the more restrictive standard must be struck down. “Even when pursuing a legitimate interest, a State may not choose means that unnecessarily restrict constitutionally protected liberty,”

Question 3: What could you do as Secretary of State to ensure campaign contribution transparency to the public?

When the general election rolls around, most Democrats (38%) will vote for the Democratic candidate and most Republicans (30%) will vote for the Republican candidate. Issues such as conducting audits and campaign finance don’t matter to these voters – just the party name on the ballot. I don’t believe any candidate for Secretary of State has ever openly challenged the constitutionality of partisan elections. It remains to be seen if Independents (29%) will support such a candidate. I think it unlikely that Independent voters will care much about audits and campaign finance. In 2008 and again in 2014, Oregonians voted on initiative petitions to abolish partisan elections. Both times the result was the same. 2/3 against and 1/3 for. 33% of the vote is not enough to pass an initiative petition but it may be enough to win a three-way race for Secretary of State.

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StarSection 13: Candidates for Oregon Treasurer

 

  • Term= 4 years
  • Salary= $72,000

(Only 2 questions for the Oregon Treasurer candidates.)

Candidates

T. ReadTobias Read   www.tobiasread.com  (DEM)

Question 1: How would you ensure that State funds are invested safely and at good rates?

The Oregon State Treasurer manages a portfolio of more than $90 billion. I’ll use my legislative and professional experience to ensure we are invested prudently and safely. Oregon is a major shareholder, giving us a seat at the table. We need to use that seat effectively to influence corporate policies. I’ll take an active role in protecting our state’s money by creating a Corporate Governance position in the Treasury whose priority will be to support a long view of good performance. This can include stronger links between CEO compensation as well as real measures of long-term performance, so CEOs aren’t overpaid or rewarded when their publicly traded companies perform badly.   I will also work with other Treasurers to urge the SEC to require corporations that rely heavily on fossil fuels to disclose carbon-related investment risks. This policy would result in additional corporate disclosure, giving Oregonians the chance to know the real costs associated with burning fossil fuels.

Question 2: What are your recommendations regarding PERS (Public Employee Retirement System)?

The Treasurer has the opportunity to play a significant role in creating and setting policy to bolster PERS investments. In fact, generating returns on the state’s investments is one of the most important things the Treasurer can do.   One solution I’d like to pursue as State Treasurer could save the pension system billions over a 20-year period by slashing Wall Street fees and bringing Oregon’s investments in-house. Right now, we outsource a lot of our investment duties to expensive Wall Street firms. By bringing those functions back to Oregon, we can improve our investment structure in a number of ways–earn money to fill the pensions gap, modernize our investment programs, and improve oversight and accountability.  Furthermore, as a member of the Oregon Investment Council, the Treasurer can promote investment strategies that focus on long-term opportunities that serve the interests of PERS members and the state.

Jeff Gudman  www.jeffgudman.com  (REP)

Question 1: How would you ensure that State funds are invested safely and at good rates?

It is vitally important that Oregon’s next Treasurer  it is vitally important that Oregon’s next Treasurer actually have experience as a Treasurer.  The depth and breadth of my experience (education, business, volunteer and elected) means an ability to not only understand the policies and investments of the $90 billion of state investable assets but to guide them towards maximizing the returns while minimizing risk so as to provide for more of the programs and services we as Oregonians need.  The arc of my life has uniquely prepared me to serve as Oregon’s next Treasurer and not as a stepping stone to another office.

Question 2: What are your recommendations regarding PERS (Public Employee Retirement System)?

The ruling of the Oregon State Supreme Court has defined the range of options available for action.  While  we should always consider how our next contractual commitments will affect us in the future, the previous ones are strictly off the table. I will bring an open mind and a commitment  to develop solutions which provide for retirement security balanced with the projected future investment returns, the need for service, and the ability of Oregonians pay to support services wanted.  The Treasurer has a fiduciary responsibility to maximize the risk return relationship on the PERS investments and to provide benefits bargained for and judicially approved by the state Supreme Court. Bringing all parties to the table to make sure the plan is officially funded is a roll of the treasurer judicially approved by the state Supreme Court. Bringing all parties to the table to make sure the plan is sufficiently funded is a roll of the Treasurer

C. TelferChris Telfer  www.telferfortreasurer.com  (I)

Question 1: How would you ensure that State funds are invested safely and at good rates?

Avoiding shooting for outsized results which exposes the fund to outsized losses in down markets; a divestment away from risk assets and toward capital-preserving/income producing ones will reduce period-to-period fluctuation and limit the exposure to protracted periods of loss.  Managing the debt of the State will be in the forefront of my office.  As Treasurer I will push back on any attempt to borrow our way out of budget stresses as well as protect our bond rating.  As a member of the Oregon Innovation Council and Oregon Growth Board I will aggressively seek out innovation-driven growth opportunities with “Oregon” companies that will lead our competitive advantage in a global economy.  I have spent over 3 decades as a CPA helping businesses grow and know what it takes to grow jobs.

Question 2: What are your recommendations regarding PERS (Public Employee Retirement System)?

The State Treasurer has the fiduciary responsibility to protect the retirement funds and honor the commitments made to our valued public workers.  As Treasurer, I would also recognize the responsibility to all Oregonians and the need to bring stability to PERS which is essential for long-term budgeting at the city, county and state levels.  The demand on increased employer contributions is slated to be the biggest economic event in the next two biennia. Oregon’s PERS system is in crisis and will affect every Oregonian.  In a nutshell, in spite of progress of the 2003 reforms, PERS needs another overhaul.  There is no single solution or magic bullet and the problem has to be attacked from several angles, including current PERS policies, future benefit obligations, management practices, the current investment approach, member contributions, employer contribution sand the “side-accounts”.  As a former State Senator I know how to work with the legislator on these tasks.

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StarSection 14: Candidates for Oregon Supreme Court Judges

 

  • Term= 6 years
  • Salary=  $134,000 – Chief, $131,000 Member

Question 1: What is the area of greatest need in Oregon’s justice system, and how should state government respond?

Question 2: How does the work of the Courts, both trial and appellate, affect the lives of Oregonians?

Question 3: What is your vision for the future of Oregon’s judicial system?

(There are 3 candidates, no responses.)

Candidates

Position 6 Lynn R Nakamoto
Position 5 Jack L Landau

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StarSection 15: Spring 2016 League Candidate Forums

For a complete and updated list of our events, visit: www.lwvor.org/join us/events-calendar/

April 1

Eugene – Candidate Forum: Lane CO Commissioner, North Eugene
April 1, 2016, 12:00pm – 1:20pm
UO Academic Extension, Downtown Baker Center, 975 High St. Eugene. One of a series of candidate Forums presented this spring for voters. $5 for non-City Club of Eugene members; free for members. www.lwvlc.org

April 8

Eugene – Candidate Forum: Mayor
April 8, 2016, 12:00pm – 1:30pm
UO Academic Extension, Downtown Baker Center, 975 High St., Eugene. An opportunity to learn more about Eugene mayoral candidates. Free for City Club of Eugene members; $5 for non-members. A free Forum featuring Eugene mayor candidates will be held April 28th, 7pm, Willamette HS. www.lwvlc.org

April 12

Eugene – Candidate Forum: City Council, Ward 1
April 12, 2016, 7:30pm – 8:30pm
First Methodist Church, 1376 Olive St., Eugene. City of Eugene voters are invited to a Forum for Eugene City Council candidates, Ward 1. The Forum is one of a series presented by the LWVLC in collaboration with several local organizations. Free. www.lwvlc.org

April 14

Medford Jackson CO Board of Commissioner Candidates Forum
April 14, 2016, 12:00pm – 1:00pm
3rd Floor, Medford City Council Chambers, Medford City Hall, 411 W. 8th St. Medford. Candidates are incumbent Doug Breidenthal, Gordon Challistrom, Bob Strosser and Jeff Thomas. Geoffrey Riley, Jefferson Radio, moderator. Our League is formulating candidate questions. You are welcome to submit yours to VoterServices@lwvroguevalley.org. Written questions will be taken at the Forum.

LWVPDX – Candidates for City of Portland Mayor
April 14, 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
Multnomah CO Board Room 501 SE Hawthorne, Portland. Partnering with Buckman Community Association. www.lwvpdx.org/

April 15

Eugene – Candidate Forum: City Council Ward 1
April 15, 2016, 12:00pm – 1:20pm
UO Academic Extension, Downtown Baker Center, 975 High St., Eugene.
Eugene voters are invited to learn about City Council Ward 1 candidates. Audience questions will be taken from members. www.lwvlc.org

April 19

Eugene – 2 Candidate Forums: OR HD 14 & Lane CO Commissioner, North
April 19, 2016, 7:00pm – 8:00pm
Willamette HS, 1801 Echo Hollow Rd., Eugene. Lane CO residents are invited to learn more about State House District 14 candidates This Forum will be followed by another one featuring candidates for CO Commissioner, North Eugene. Free. www.lwvlc.org

Gold Beach – Candidate Forums : Curry CO races: Commissioner Positions 2 & 3, District Attorney, Senator, OR SD1, Circuit Court Judge 15th District.
April 19, 2016 – 7pm – 9pm
Gold Beach City Hall, 29592 Ellensburg Ave, Gold Beach www.lwvcurry.org/

April 20

Port Oreford – Candidate Forums : Curry CO races: Commissioner Positions 2 & 3, District Attorney, Senator, OR SD1, Circuit Court Judge 15th District.
April 20, 2016 – 7pm – 9pm
555 West 20th St Port Orford www.lwvcurry.org/

April 21

Brookings – Candidate Forums : Curry CO races: Commissioner Positions 2 & 3, District Attorney, Senator, OR SD1, Circuit Court Judge 15th District.
April 21, 2016 – 7pm-9pm
405 Alder St, Brookings www.lwvcurry.org/

April 25

LWVPDX – Candidates for City of Portland Commissioners
April 25, 2016, 6:00pm – 8:30pm
Multnomah CO Board Room, 501 SE Hawthorne, Portland.
“Gas Tax” Ballot Measure. www.lwvpdx.org/

April 27

LWVPDX – Candidates for Multnomah CO Commissioner & Metro Councilor
April 27, 2016, 6:00pm – 9:00pm
MetroEast Community Media Studios, 829 NE 8th St, Gresham. www.lwvpdx.org/

April 28

Corvallis Benton CO Commissioner Pos #2 Forum
& OR HD 23 Candidates’ Debate
April 28, 2016, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
Corvallis-Benton CO Public Library, 645 NW Monroe Ave, Corvallis. http://www.lwv.corvallis.or.us/

Eugene – Candidate Forum for Eugene Mayor
April 28, 2016, 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Harris Hall, 125 E. 8th St., Eugene.
An opportunity for Eugene voters to learn more about Eugene Mayoral candidates. Free. www.lwvlc.org

Salem City Council candidates
Thursday, April 28, 6 – 8 p.m.
Anderson Room, Salem Public Library, 585 Liberty St. SE
Sponsored by LWV and Salem City Club

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StarSection 16: ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This non partisan Voters’ Guide is published by The League Of Women Voters® of Oregon. Please join us in encouraging informed and active participation of citizens in government. . Tax-deductible donations may be made to the League of Women Voters of Oregon at: http://lwvor.org/donate/.

Our membership is open to men and women. If you are interested, we’ll send you membership information. There are Leagues in many communities around the state. Send your name, address, phone number and email address to:

1330 12th St. SE, Suite 200

Salem, OR 97302

Phone: 503-581-5722  www.lwvor.org

PRODUCTION TEAM

  • First Vice President, Voter Service and Education: Rebecca Gladstone
  • Administrative Manager:
    Sarah Andrews
  • Distribution: Arthur Wilson
  • Support Team: Mary Sinclair, Rebecca Gladstone, Margaret Bengry, Anne Emmons, Karen Kunz, Katie Lu, Barbara Klein
  • Large Print Script:
    Rebecca Gladstone

Benefactors ($6,000+)

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Supporters ($1,000- $2,999)

Talking Book and Braille Library,
     Oregon State Library

Rebecca and Igor Gladstone, Jr

Margaret and Gordon Noel

LWV of Portland

Norman Turrill

Karan Kuntz

LWV of Lane CO

LWV of Umpqua Valley

Merilyn Reeves

Ruth Kistler

Veronika Walton

Paid for by the League of Women Voters® of Oregon. Thank you for taking the time to read this important information. This concludes the May 2016 LWVOR Voters’ Guide.

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